Spring 2002 Forward to a Friend

Your Turn Letters from our Readers


Holstein Hauler

You receive countless letters describing the uses of a Subaru wagon. Perhaps our use is a first. Every summer we drive from Minnesota to the family farm in New England to immerse ourselves in farm life. Our 8- and 10-year-old daughters look forward to going because their grandfather always arranges to get Holstein calves for them from another farmer who lives about 10 miles away. The first year, as we pondered how to get the calves from the neighboring farmer back to the family farm, it occurred to us to put our Impreza to the test. As you can see from the enclosed photo, transporting the calves in our Subaru works, well, almost perfectly.

Laurie Burnham
St. Paul, Minnesota


This calf has a window seat in the Burnham’s Subaru wagon.

Is OnStar® the Answer?

I am driving a 2000 Subaru Legacy wagon, my third in the last 20-plus years. This summer I was lost three times – in Chicago, in the farm fields of northern Indiana, and very late one night in Jackson, Michigan. I am intrigued by the concept of OnStar and I have heard it is available on certain Subaru vehicles.

Linda Colburn
Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

This issue includes an article about how OnStar and the global positioning system (GPS) work.

 

Compassionate Response To “Rescuing Animals”

I want to thank you for including the article, “Rescuing Animals: A Safety Net for Animals During Disasters” in the winter 2002 issue of Drive. This article reassures me that Subaru values kindness to all creatures and commends organizations such as the Emergency Animal Rescue Service (EARS). I have used my 1998 Subaru Legacy Wagon on many occasions to transport injured and orphaned wildlife for animal rescue local organizations. I will certainly contact EARS and see how I may help with their efforts. Thank you again for promoting compassion.

Heather Hembrey
Gainesville, Virginia

A Fine Legacy

This letter is from a research associate who is excavating dinosaur bones in northwestern Wyoming.

I work alone and driving my Subaru Impreza RS to remote, rugged areas does not intimidate me or cause me any misgivings (except when I scratch the paint a bit). Knowing that my vehicle is not likely to strand me in a desert or high on a mountain is a feeling of security that one who does a job such as mine needs. It has been an utterly reliable vehicle and a real head turner. I often take it for long cross-country drives that might involve mountain passes and inclement weather.

I hope you enjoy these photographs of my RS being used to assist me in collecting dinosaur bones for the Museum of Natural History & Science in Cincinnati. My Subaru carried the limb bone of the youngest diplodocid sauropod (a large plant-eating dinosaur) known on the planet. The leg bone fit in the passenger side of the car.

Marilyn D. Wegweiser, Ph.D.
Cincinnati Museum Center,
Geier Collections and Research Center

The Petkos’ Subaru vehicles, ready to take on the snow.

What’s A Little Snow?

How’s this for a license plate? Our 2000 Subaru Outback wears the tag “SU BEAR U,” a combination of Subaru and our last name.

My cars have always had some sort of plate with “bear” in the wording. BEARLY, 4 BEAR, and BEARRS are just a few of them. When we purchased our Outback, “SU BEAR U” came to mind immediately.

We’re not proud of driving our Outback around, are we?

Brian Bear
Kenosha, Wisconsin

 

It Bears His Name

Thank you for the Nebraska Sandhills Road Trip article (summer 2001). Many of us who live here rarely take advantage of the diversity Nebraska offers.

I recently took a business trip through Valentine and Chadron, Nebraska, in our ’99 Legacy (I left the Jeep at home and rode in comfort), following much of the route your article described. You rekindled my road trip urges. Honey, pack up the baby! We’re going on a road trip!

David Ommen
Omaha, Nebraska

 

A Grateful Owner

I couldn’t have been more satisfied with my first Subaru vehicle’s performance and the service I received from my dealership. So, when it was time for me to trade, I didn’t need to test drive one. Later, my belief in the performance and safety of my 2001 Outback was reaffirmed in a significant way when I had a collision with another vehicle. At that moment, the design and manufacturing of my Subaru was called into action and protected me. After the accident, I had only bruises. The police officer in charge of the wreck told me that he couldn’t believe the integrity of the car in its protection of me in comparison to the damages it sustained.

Now that my beautiful Outback is total loss, what should I do? You guessed it. I want another one just like it from the same people. When I go out in my Subaru, I will have the confidence that it has been well cared for and will perform to the best of its technical ability to protect me. Please keep up the fine craftsmanship and care that you and your dealers provide.

Kathryn K. Buchanan
Roanoke, Virginia

 

A Special Thank You To Drive Readers

Dr. James R. Scott

What a wonderful way to start the new year with the support of the Subaru company and Drive readers. On behalf of Bird Treatment and Learning Center (TLC) volunteers who last year cared for over 950 birds (including 49 bald eagles) let me thank all who purchased Eberhard Brunner’s collector print featured in the fall 2001 issue of Drive. In my view, there is nothing more majestic than a soaring bald eagle! The artistry of Mr. Brunner, the production efforts of the Drive staff and the support of Subaru were outstanding.

The donated funds will help us continue our rehabilitation work and education outreach programs throughout Alaska. Even though 100 percent of our rehabilitation workers and educators are volunteers, we have substantial operational costs that will be offset by the print sale revenues. It is my dream to one day build a new center for Bird TLC. It will always be our commitment to care for sick, injured and orphaned wild birds, to release as many as possible and to educate the public about the importance of birds in our world. Thank you all!

James R. Scott, D.V.M.
Founder and Medical Director
Bird Treatment and Learning Center

 

The Paces’ dogs get ready to go for a ride.

Going To The Dogs

I loved reading your story about EARS volunteer Ann Plamondon (Drive, winter 2002). She said her volunteer work rescuing animals was the reason she purchased her Subaru Outback. Like Plamondon, my husband and I considered the animal transport capacity of the Outback to be a key selling point.

After we acquired a third dog through our volunteer rescue work, it was clear that we needed a different vehicle. Our four-door sedan was too small, and the dogs could travel in the back of our capped pickup truck only when the weather wasn’t too hot or too cold. We considered an SUV, but it was too high for our arthritic dog. After test driving the Outback Wagon, we knew we’d found the perfect solution.

Deborah L. Pace
Valparaiso, Indiana

 

Comforts Of Home

My Subaru Legacy station wagon is my home on wheels.

The heater is the fireplace. The tape deck is where I can listen to an audio book or a concert. The driver’s seat is my comfortable armchair. I have the glove compartment and other storage compartments organized like office filing cabinets with important papers and refrigerator “to do” lists. The windows are views of the beautiful drive I have in the mountains.

I expect my real home to be a safe and well-structured building. I get this in my Subaru. My Subaru Legacy wagon drives like a sports car, has space like a van and features All-Wheel Drive.

Joanne Kloepfer
Genoa, Nevada

 

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