Winter 2008 Forward to a Friend


NO CHILD LEFT INSIDE

Boy with Dog

ONE EVENING WHEN MY BOYS WERE YOUNGER, MATTHEW, THEN 10, LOOKED AT ME FROM ACROSS A RESTAURANT TABLE AND SAID QUITE SERIOUSLY, “DAD, HOW COME IT WAS MORE FUN WHEN YOU WERE A KID?”

“Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically.”
~ Richard Louv, Author

I ASKED WHAT HE MEANT.

“WELL, YOU’RE ALWAYS TALKING ABOUT YOUR WOODS AND TREE HOUSES, AND HOW YOU USED TO RIDE THAT HORSE DOWN NEAR THE SWAMP.”

At first, I thought he was irritated with me. I had, in fact, been telling him what is was like to use string and pieces of liver to catch crawdads in a creek, something I’d be hard-pressed to find a child doing these days. Like many parents do, I do tend to romanticize my own childhood – and, I fear, too readily discount my children’s experiences of play and adventure. But my son was serious; he felt he had missed out on something important.



“Well-meaning public school systems, media, and parents are effectively scaring children straight out of the woods and fields.”
~ Richard Louv, Author

He was right. Americans around my age, baby boomers or older, enjoyed a kind of free, natural play that seems, in the era of kid pagers, instant messaging, and Nintendo, like a quaint artifact.

Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically. The polarity of the relationship has reversed. Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment – but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading. That’s exactly the opposite of how it was when I was a child.

As a boy, I was unaware that my woods were ecologically connected with any other forests. Nobody in the 1950s talked about acid rain or holes in the ozone layer or global warming. But I knew my woods and my fields; I knew every bend in the creek and dip in the beaten dirt paths. I wandered those woods even in my dreams. A kid today can likely tell you about the Amazon rain forest – but not about the last time he or she explored the woods in solitude, or lay in a field listening to the wind and watching the clouds move.

The shift in our relationship to the natural world is startling, even in settings that one would assume are devoted to nature. Not that long ago, summer camp was a place where you camped, hiked in the woods, learned about plants and animals, or told firelight stories about ghosts or mountain lions. As likely as not today, “summer camp” is a weight-loss camp, or a computer camp. For a new generation, nature is more abstraction than reality. Increasingly, nature is something to watch, to consume, to wear – to ignore. A recent television ad depicts a four-wheel-drive SUV racing along a breathtakingly beautiful mountain stream – while in the backseat two children watch a movie on a flip-down movie screen, oblivious to the landscape and water beyond the windows.

greenhour.org

www.greenhour.org
Find the information, tools, and inspiration you need to get you and your kids outside! Visit the National Wildlife Federation’s www.greenhour.org, a Web site rich in family-friendly content and which hosts a supportive virtual community where families can learn, explore, and share their outdoor experiences and backyard adventures.
Boys in Tree

A century ago, the historian Frederick Jackson Turner announced that the American frontier had ended. His thesis has been discussed and debated ever since. Today, a similar and more important line is being crossed.

Our society is teaching young people to avoid direct experiences in nature. That lesson is delivered in schools, families, even organizations devoted to the outdoors, and codified into the legal and regulatory structures of many of our communities. Our institutions, urban/suburban design, and cultural attitudes unconsciously associate nature with doom – while disassociating the outdoors from joy and solitude. Well-meaning public school systems, media, and parents are effectively scaring children straight out of the woods and fields. In the patent-or-perish environment of higher education, we see the death of natural history as the more hands-on disciplines, such as zoology, give way to more theoretical and remunerative microbiology and genetic engineering. Rapidly advancing technologies are blurring the lines between humans, other animals, and machines.

The postmodern notion that reality is only a construct – that we are what we program – suggests limitless human possibilities; but as the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experiences.

Boy with Leaves

Yet, at the very moment that the bond is breaking between the young and the natural world, a growing body of research links our mental, physical, and spiritual health directly to our association with nature – in positive ways. Several of these studies suggest that thoughtful exposure of youngsters to nature can even be a powerful form of therapy for attention-deficit disorders and other maladies. As one scientist puts it, we can now assume that just as children need good nutrition and adequate sleep, they may very well need contact with nature.



GREEN SPACE VERSUS SCREEN SPACE

Most adults of a certain age have childhood memories of carefree days spent playing outdoors – climbing, digging, collecting, building, and exploring the natural world around them, at their own pace, in their own way.

Those children of a generation ago are the parents of today, and you might expect such outdoor play to be part of their families’ lifestyle. But today’s overscheduled kids are increasingly “plugged in” to electronic devices and media and unplugged from the fundamental and formative experience of nature in their own neighborhood. Their senses – including, most sadly, their sense of wonder – are bombarded, overwhelmed, and ultimately diminished.

Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods, refers to this nature-child disconnect as “nature deficit disorder.” One of the primary symptoms is the replacement of the green space by the screen space as the occupier of children’s free time. Indeed, a Kaiser Family Foundation study found that the average American child spends 44 hours per week (more than six hours a day) staring at some kind of electronic screen. Studies have linked excessive television viewing to obesity, violence, and even lower intelligence in kids. Now, a growing wave of research indicates that children who spend time outdoors are healthier, overall, than their indoor counterparts.

Reducing that deficit – healing the broken bond between our young and nature – is in our self-interest, not only because aesthetics or justice demands it, but also because our mental, physical, and spiritual health depends upon it. The health of the earth is at stake as well. How the young respond to nature, and how they raise their own children, will shape the configurations and conditions of our cities, homes – our daily lives.

Many people now of college age – those who belong to the first generation to grow up in a largely de-natured environment – have tasted just enough nature to intuitively understand what they have missed. This yearning is a source of power. These young people resist the rapid slide from the real to the virtual, from the mountains to the Matrix. They do not intend to be the last children in the woods.

From Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv. Copyright © 2005 by Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. Reprinted by arrangement with the publisher. To order a copy, please visit the Workman Publishing Company Inc. Web site at www.workman.com.



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NO CHILD LEFT INSIDE COALITION
Because of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), many schools are scaling back or eliminating environmental education programs. Congress has the opportunity to change this with the reauthorization of NCLB.

The No Child Left Inside Coalition, which includes the National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society, North American Association for Environmental Education, and many other education and environmental organizations, is working with Congress to include environmental education in NCLB.

By making a few changes to NCLB, we can dramatically improve our schools’ ability to prepare children for real-world challenges and careers, and ensure an environmentally sustainable future.

Learn more: www.eenclb.org